Porch Handrails


The porch is 3 feet off the ground, so I needed some sort of railing. I wanted something light in appearance, which ruled out wood or the typical aluminum railings available around here. However, I did have my Lincoln® SP-175T wire feeder welder, and a desire for something different.

I arrived at the design using AutoCAD LT, with the small bars all radiating every 5 degrees from a point at the base of the porch. This could have been done with a calculator, but AutoCAD made it easy.

For the railing itself I used 1" and 1/2" square tubing, both 1/16" wall thickness. I cut and measured the vertical and horizontal pieces, then welded them together square. The frame was then placed on a wooden jig on sawhorses, with the frame recessed in 1/4" slots. This allowed the radiating bars to be clamped and welded into place, hitting the middle of the frame rails.

I used mainly .023" and .030" diameter Lincoln® MIG wire although when I ran out, I used Lincoln® flux-cored wire as well.

Finishing was done by a local company, who hot dip galvanized and then powder coated it for what I hope will be a maintenance free finish.

 

Porch Handrails

 

Porch Handrails

 

Porch Handrails

 

Important Safety Note: 
If you design or construct a hand railing, be sure your design will not permit a person's hand or foot or a small child's head to become caught in the baluster.

Many local codes include specific safety requirements for hand railings, among other things, including a maximum baluster spacing of 4". As always, check applicable local code and consider potential safety concerns when you design or build a hand railing or any other project.

 

*The above project images and descriptions have been published to show how individuals used their ingenuity for their own needs, convenience and enjoyment. Only limited details are available and the projects have NOT been engineered by the Lincoln Electric Company. Therefore, when you use the ideas for projects of your own, you must develop your own details and plans and the safety and performance of your work is your responsibility.